ISA - AUTO-INJECTOR FOR ANAPHYLAXIS PATIENTS

Umeå Insitute of Design | 2 weeks group project  | 2016

In cooperation with Jenny Holmsten, Piotr Kuklo and Yue Yuan.

MY CONTRIBUTION sound design, experience design, research.

An intuitive Epinephrine auto-injector for patients with severe allergy. Device guides users with sound and light.

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Background

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Scale of the problem

0.05–2% of the population is estimated to experience anaphylaxis at some point - it's 73 000 000 people.

 
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84% of patients misuse auto-injectors

One of the most common errors is failure to hold the unit in place for at least 10 seconds after triggering.

 

Process

 

Market research

 

Interviews

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Usage

Existing solutions are difficult to use and terrifying.

Users don't know that injection should last 10 sec.

Instructions on the pen are overwhelming.

Maintanance

It's inconvenient to carry with you two big auto-injectors.

Users need to remember to renew auto-injectors each year, even if they haven't been used.

 

Problem definition

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Intimidating look of auto-injectors

Auto-injectors look overly complicated and attract a lot of attention if accidentally seen by others.

 
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Hard to find

There is no system in place to make it easier to find auto-injector in case of attack.

 
 
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Visual overload

Existing solutions don't provide clear instruction and it's usually only visual information.

 
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Lack of feedback

Users don't get any feedback on the time injection should last.

 

Sound and interaction studies

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Initial walkthrough

Meaning of sound and light | 4 users

In the initial research we've explored the possibilities of light and sound guiding user through the process. We also asked users to do card sorting indicating how certain sound affected them. on an emotional level.

 

'Silence is also an indicator, you don't need to communicate every change with a new sound.'

- C.

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Wizard of Oz

Type of feedback | 4 users

During the Wizard of Oz research we tested if our solution is understandable without detailed instruction. All of the users who haven't used auto-injector before performed task correctly. 

 

'This sound somehow made me keep injector on my leg, even thought I didn't know how long I'm suppose to do it.'

- H.

 

Concept

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Ready to go!

Device is ready to use after removing the cap and loading - user gets clear feedback when to start. 

 
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Guiding user

The sequence of sound and light guides user preventing most common mistake - not keeping self-injector long enough on the tight of the leg.

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Countdown timer

To prevent one of the most common mistakes injector is counting the injection time - 10 seconds.

 
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Non stigmatizing

Sleek design and reusable part of the auto-injector allows for a more personal relationship with the device.

 
 
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Magnetic attachment

Since user needs to carry two auto-injectors they can be connected with each other thanks to magnets embedded in the main body of the device.

 
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Reusable

While other solutions on the market are disposable in case of Isa only part with needle and medicine need to be replaced after using it.

 
 
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Step-by-step instruction

Easy visual instruction doesn't overload user with unnecessary information. 

 
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Color coding

Part with the needle is marked with alerting shade of orange.

 
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Reminders & trigger for pen-alarm

Pen can be found more easily after triggering sound and light alarm. It can be started from the application or by shaking bag where we keep pen.

App additionally reminds about annual renewal of auto-injectors.

 

Automatic call to the hospital

After the injection app automatically calls the nearest hospital.

 

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